Kate Groobey wins the Daiwa Foundation Art Prize

The artist is the first female winner in the award’s history

‘Harvest Time’ by Kate Groobey, 2018. Courtesy of the artist

The British artist Kate Groobey has become the first woman to win the Daiwa Foundation Art Prize in the award’s history. Currently showing her work at the Daiwa Foundation Japan House until 13 July alongside that of the other two shortlisted artists, Keith Milow and Mark Neville, Groobey will also have the opportunity to exhibit at Mizuma Art Gallery in Tokyo, Japan, this autumn.  

 

‘Moon-gazer’ by Kate Groobey, 2017. Courtesy of the artist

Known for her dynamic, colourful artworks, which blend personal stories with cultural references, Groobey works in watercolour, oil paint, video, animation and even performance. Her recent watercolour series, Pure Pleasure, was inspired by a Picasso painting, Man and Woman, in which the male figure points a knife at the woman’s vagina. Realising that the male gaze has traditionally dominated the art world, Groobey decided to explore the creative potential of a woman painting her female lover. The result is a set of works that are full of emotional depth and vitality, yet also provoke thought about the narrow conventions of art history.  

‘Self-portrait with Rakes’ by Kate Groobey, 2018. Courtesy of the artist

The Daiwa Foundation Art Prize 2018 exhibition is at the Daiwa Foundation Japan House from 8 June to 13 July.

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