What to book: Ceramic Art London

New and established artists will showcase ceramic masterpieces at Central Saint Martins

Ceramics by Sue Pryke. Courtesy Ceramic Art London, copyright the artist 

Ceramic Art London, hosted by the Crafts Potters Association, is returning to Central Saint Martins for a third consecutive year. The exhibition will feature a range of ceramic artists, from the rising star Marike Jacobs to long-established artists such as Henry Pim. It is therefore particularly apt that the exhibition should be held at Central Saint Martins, home to more than 100 years of ceramic-art teaching.

The exhibition consistently aims to promote the value of ceramics and often crosses the divide between functionality and fine art, as in the case of Chloe Dowds’ work, which is practical yet perfectly misshapen. The show caters for a range of budgets, from Sue Pryke’s simple ceramic teaspoons at £15 each to £5,000 for a larger investment piece such as one of James Oughtibridge’s large-scale clay sculptures.

Ceramics by Chloë Dowds. Courtesy Ceramic Art London, copyright the artist 

Alongside the range of ceramics on display, students from Central Saint Martins have invited a live audience into their ceramics studio as they work, giving visitors the opportunity not only to gain further insight into the making process, but also to direct the route each new creation might take.

Ceramics by Midori Takaki. Courtesy Ceramic Art London, copyright the artist 

Grayson Perry CBE is set to give a keynote speech at this year’s event, opening the popular series of ‘Clay Talks’, which also includes a talk by Phoebe Cummings, the winner of the Woman’s Hour Craft Prize 2017, among many other leading voices in the ceramics industry.

Ceramic Art London takes place at Central Saint Martins, University of the Arts London, from 23 to 25 March. Tickets cost £15 a day or £35 for a three-day ticket.

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